MindNavigator’s HcD in action.

Sarah is part of a group of employees that has engaged in a MindNavigator HcD program. On completing the program, Sarah has found confidence and voice; her work is of a higher quality; she has developed deeper relationships both at work and with her partner; and she feels more relaxed in her role, not needing to know everything. Her development has also positively impacted the people around her, and her team members feel more empowered and engaged.

Awareness in action.

Sarah is a team leader in a technology organisation. Sarah becomes aware of a core personal value around ‘knowledge’. She really values her subject-matter expertise; her focus on ‘knowledge’ really affects how she perceives people. Her awareness practice reveals that having knowledge is connected to feeling secure in her job and also receiving recognition from others.

Sarah finds herself remaining quiet and reflective in leadership forums, even though she wants to be heard. A guided process reveals a hidden assumption that speaking up may cause people to question whether she has the relevant knowledge to perform her role. Testing her assumption by incrementally increasing her input into these meetings proves to her that her knowledge and input is valuable and builds her confidence to engage more fully with her key stakeholders and other senior leaders.

Attention in action.

Sarah brings attention to her tendency to be running her own internal dialogue whilst someone else is talking. She realises she often misses part of the conversation, including important information. She adopts a practice of mindful listening and this leads to her developing a deeper level of connection with her colleagues and a broader understanding of key challenges within the organisation.

Sarah also works on building her resilience by developing a more expansive sense of context, time and space. By expanding her attention to include all of the roles and contexts in which she is operating, she is better able to contain challenging work situations within context. In addition, by practicing zooming out to see that each situation is a point in time, she develops the ability to see beyond her current challenges and keep them in perspective.

Accountability in action.

Through more careful consideration of what she is and isn’t accountable for, Sarah realises that she often completes tasks she could easily delegate to her team. Instead of taking everything on herself, she begins to refer requests for information to relevant team members. Not only does she free up her own time but her staff feel more valued and able to contribute.

Sarah also works on balancing time between her time at the office, building more routine around her running and spending time with her partner. She notices that her work commitments are still being met and her delivery has actually improved because she is spending less time adding unnecessary detail and information to her presentations and other output.

Agility in action.

Sarah works on shifting attention from tasks to including her relationships with her colleagues. By taking time in her conversations rather than jumping straight into the detail of what needs to get done, she discovers new solutions to her department’s key challenges. She also continues to develop deeper connections with her colleagues.

As Sarah builds her agility to move between the detail and the big picture rather than focusing exclusively on the detail, her ability to delegate appropriately improves, as does her ability to grasp the key concepts, identify issues quickly and present to key stakeholders where summarising or providing an overview is important.

Actualisation in action.

Sarah wants to speak up more in leadership groups but finds herself remaining quiet and reflective. A guided process reveals a hidden assumption that speaking up may cause people to question whether she is capable enough to perform her role.

Testing her assumption by incrementally increasing her input into these meetings proves to her that her knowledge and input is valuable and builds her confidence to engage more fully with her key stakeholders and senior leaders.
Artistry in action.

Artistry in action.

Sarah works on balancing time between her time at the office, building more routine around her running and spending time with her partner. She notices that her work commitments are still being met and her delivery has actually improved because she is spending less time adding unnecessary detail and information to her presentations and other output.